kimchi & kraut

Passive House + Zero Net Energy + Permaculture Yard

Tag Archives: Green Building Advisor

Blower Door (Air Sealing #9 )

0

When it was time to schedule our blower door test we considered using Eco Achievers, but we only knew about them because they’ve worked extensively on projects for our original builder, Evolutionary Home Builders. We decided the potential awkwardness, or even a possible conflict of interest, wasn’t worth pursuing their services. An example of guilt-by-association I suppose, one that is probably unfounded, but, nevertheless, the strong affiliation with our original builder made it difficult for us to reach out to them for help. They also hired one of Brandon’s former employees (this employee was nothing but nice and professional towards us as we were deciding to part ways with Brandon), which would’ve only added another layer of awkwardness to the situation.

Unsure how to proceed, I looked online and found Anthony from Building Energy Experts. He was able to come out and do a blower door test for us, helping me hunt down a couple of small leaks, so that we ended up at 0.34 ACH@50 for this initial test.

Here’s a Hammer and Hand video discussing the use of a blower door:

On a side note: all of the Hammer and Hand videos, along with their Best Practices Manual, were incredibly helpful as we tried to figure out all the Passive House details related to our build. It’s no exaggeration to say that without Hammer and Hand, the Green Building Advisor website, BSC, and 475 HPBS, our build would’ve been impossible to accomplish on our own. I owe an incredible debt of gratitude to all of these great resources who invest valuable time sharing such a wealth of information.

Below is a Hammer and Hand video noting the importance of properly detailing corners to avoid air leaks:

Because of this video, I sealed all of my corners for the windows and doors like this:

HF Sealant in corners b4 blower door

Adding Pro Clima HF Sealant after completing taping of the corner, just for added insurance against potential air leakage.

I also added some HF Sealant to the lower portion of the windows, since some air leakage showed up in this area with Anthony where components of the window itself come together in a seam.

sealant on wdw components junction

Seam near bottom of window where components meet — sealed with HF Sealant.

Where components come together is often an area that needs special or further attention.

close up corner and wdw components seam w: sealant

Close up of this same area — seam in components sealed, along with the bottom corner of the window and the gap between window buck and window.

Even with layers of redundancy in place, in the picture below there was a small air leak still present at the bottom plate – sub flooring connection. A coating of HF Sealant easily blocked it.

Once the stud bays were insulated (after most of the siding was up), the interior walls would eventually be covered with Intello (I’ll cover the details in a future post on interior insulation), adding yet another layer of redundancy for mitigating potential air intrusion.

area of kitchen sill plate leakage

Area of kitchen sill plate leakage.

Anthony didn’t have any previous experience with a Passive House build, so it occurred to me that it might be beneficial to reach out to Floris from 475 High Performance Building Supply (he had already done our WUFI analysis for us), and Mike Conners from Kenwood Property Development to see if there was someone locally who did. Mike is a Passive House builder in Chicago who had already helped me out with some Rockwool insulation when we came up short earlier in our project (the two GC’s we fired repeatedly struggled with basic math), and he was very nice to take the time to answer some other technical questions for me as well.

Both, as it turned out, ended up recommending that I contact Steve Marchese from the Association for Energy Affordability.

Steve would eventually make three trips to the house, doing an initial blower door test after the structure was weather-tight and all the necessary penetrations had been made through our air barrier, a second test after exterior continuous insulation was installed, and a final test after drywall was up to ensure there hadn’t been any increase in air leakage during the final stages of construction.

Steve starting blower door test

Steve setting up the blower door for his first test.

Following Passive House principles for our build, we also followed the same protocols for the blower door tests: Blower Door Protocol

With the structure under pressure from the blower door fan, Steve and I walked around the house while he used a small smoke machine in order to try and find any leaks that I could then seal up.

Steve testing window gasket

Steve starting at the windows. Here testing a window gasket for air leakage.

The gaskets around our windows and doors proved to be some of the weakest areas in the house although, comparatively speaking, it was inconsequential since the overall air tightness of the structure was fairly robust (favorite word of architects).

Steve showing impact of unlocked window

Steve showing me the impact a window in the unlocked position can have on air tightness. The gasket, ordinarily squeezed in the locked position, works to bring the sash and the frame tightly together.

 

Steve smoke at family rm wdw

Looking for areas around the windows that might need adjusting or additional air sealing.

For instance, even though no substantial air leakage showed up around this kitchen door, during our first winter this same door eventually had ice form outside at the upper corner by the hinges, on the exposed surface of the gasket where the door meets the frame.

Steve at kitchen door

After figuring out how to adjust the door hinges, there was no longer any ice showing up this winter, not even during our Polar Vortex event in late January.

Much the same thing occurred around our front door as well, with the same solution — adjusting the hinges to get a tighter fit at the gasket between the door and the frame.

Steve testing attic hatch

Steve testing the attic hatch for air leaks.

Steve was nice enough to go around and methodically check all the penetrations in the structure.

Steve testing plumbing vent in kitchen

Steve testing for air leaks around the kitchen plumbing vent and some conduit.

 

Steve testing for air leaks @ radon stack

Steve testing for air leaks around the radon stack.

 

Steve @ radon stack close up

Close up of radon stack during smoke test.

There was one area in the guest bathroom where the Intello ended up getting slightly wrinkled in a corner during installation. With Tescon Vana and some HF Sealant I was able to address it so nothing, thankfully, showed up during the smoke test.

Steve testing wrinkled area of Intello

Steve testing area of Intello that I inadvertently wrinkled during its installation.

After looking around on the main floor, Steve moved down into the basement.

Steve testing for air leaks @ main panel

Checking for leaks at the main electrical panel.

 

Steve testing for air leaks @ main panel exit point

Checking for leaks at the conduit as it exits the structure.

 

Steve testing for air leak @ sump pit cap

Looking for air leakage around the sump pit lid.

The lids for the sump pit and the ejector pit were eventually sealed with duct seal putty and some Prosoco Air Dam.

Steve testing for air leaks @ ejector pit

Testing the ejector pit for air movement.

 

Steve testing for air leaks @ Zehnder exit point

Checking for air leakage around one of the Zehnder ComfoPipes as it exits the structure.

 

Steve testing for air leaks @ pvc:refrigerant lines

Looking for air leaks around the heat pump refrigerant lines as they exit the structure.

 

Steve smoke at sump discharge

Checking around the penetration for our sump pump discharge to the outside.

Before the second blower door test, I was able to add some duct seal putty to the lids of the sump and ejector pits.

ejector pump lid w: duct seal

Ejector pit lid with some duct seal putty.

Below is a copy of Steve’s blower door test results, showing the information it provides:

Final Blower Door Test Results

For the last two tests Steve used a smaller duct blaster fan in order to try and get a more precise reading for air leakage.

Steve at front door

With Steve just after the initial blower door test was complete.

Steve would be back two more times — once before drywall, and once after drywall — just to ensure we had no loss of air tightness develop in the interim stages of the build (especially after continuous exterior insulation with furring strips were installed).

Here are the final figures noting where we ended up:

0.20 ACH@50 and 106 cfm@50

We are well below Passive House requirements (both PHI and PHIUS), so there was a great sense of relief knowing that all the time and effort put into air sealing had paid off, giving us the tight shell we were looking for. Even so, it was still pretty exciting news, especially for a first build.

And here’s an interesting article by 475 HPBS regarding the debate over how air tightness is calculated for PHI vs. PHIUS projects, and the potential ramifications: Not Airtight

 

 

 

HVAC (Part 2 of 2): Ductless Mini Split

0

System Requirements

The plan for our house was to combine an HRV or an ERV (for a continuous supply of fresh air), with a ductless mini split air source heat pump system for our ventilation, heating, and air conditioning needs. Almost all of the projects I had read about utilized this same combination, especially here in the US.

The only real debate, apart from specific brand options, was whether or not to utilize only one distribution head on our main floor, as opposed to installing multiple heads for a more ‘dialed-in’ level of comfort (e.g., in the basement, or the bedrooms).

Our original builder had in our construction drawings one head in the kitchen/family room and one in the basement, which was pretty standard for a Passive House level project. It was, therefore, pretty shocking to find out that our second builder (there were two partners) and their HVAC subcontractor were suggesting a system that was grossly oversized for our needs. You can read about the details here: GBA: Oversized System 

This was just one of many ‘red flags’ that convinced us to move on and GC the project ourselves. It’s also a reminder that old habits die hard, meaning even seasoned contractors, in any trade, need to be willing to learn new ideas and techniques if they want to truly be considered professionals and craftsmen — unfortunately, they’re the exception to the rule, at least in our experience.

One of the disappointments associated with our build is, in fact, the disinterest (in some cases even outright hectoring contempt) shown by various tradespeople in our area for ‘green’ building generally. Doubtless, at least a partial explanation for why much of the Midwest seems so far behind in adopting ‘green’ building techniques, especially when it comes to air sealing, insulation, and IAQ beyond code minimum standards. Hopefully this changes significantly in the coming years.

Consequently, I took Steve Knapp’s advice (from the comments section of my question) and contacted Home Energy Partners (their new name: HVAC Design Pros). Isaac responded quickly and eventually did our Manual J, confirming we needed a much smaller system, one that is more consistent with a Passive House project, or even just a high-performance build more generally.

Here are a couple of Matt Risinger videos detailing a mini split set-up that’s fairly typical for a Passive House or a Pretty Good House (GBA article on the 2.0 version).

 

Once we were on our own, in addition to going with a Zehnder ERV and a Mitsubishi ductless mini split air-source heat pump system, we also pursued the possibility of using a Sanden heat pump water heater.

After seeing it used on a Hammer and Hand project, we thought it was a really interesting piece of cutting edge technology:

Unfortunately, after getting a quote from Greg of Sutor Heating and Cooling, and a poor response from Sanden regarding questions we had about the system (they were unresponsive to emails), we decided to stick with our Zehnder, the Mitsubishi heat pump, and then go with a Rheem heat pump water heater (going with the Rheem saved us just over $6,000 in initial cost). Hopefully, as it becomes more popular in the US, the Sanden can come down significantly in price, or maybe less expensive copycat products will someday show up on the market.

Greg was initially willing to work with us, even though we were technically out of his service area, when the Sanden was involved, but once it was only a ductless mini split he suggested we find a Mitsubishi Diamond installer closer to us, which we understood. He was nothing but professional, taking the time to answer any number of technical questions and offering what proved to be sage advice regarding various details for our system.

In fact, taking Greg’s advice, we contacted a Diamond installer close to us, but unfortunately the first installer we contacted disappeared when we were trying to get him to communicate with our electrician on installation details (an infuriating and painfully common experience when trying to build a new house — especially one with unconventional Passive House details).

 

 

Finding our Installer

At this point, we were lucky to find Mike from Compass Heating and Air. He came out to the job site and we walked through the details together. He proved to be knowledgeable, helpful, detail-oriented, and extremely professional. Installing our Mitsubishi ductless mini split system with Mike proved to be one of the easiest portions of our build. We never felt like we had to look over his shoulder, making sure he got details right, or that we had to constantly confirm that he did what he said he was going to do — in fact, it was the opposite: ‘Mike’s on site, so that’s one less thing I have to worry about’.

Compass truck on site

Mike and his crew at the job site to install our Mitsubishi ductless mini split system for heating and air conditioning.

Mike also confirmed what Greg and Isaac also pointed out: comfort issues may develop if we tried to get by with just one distribution head on the main floor.

In fact, looking back through old emails, Greg was nice enough to walk me through some of the options employed by those trying to get by with a single head for an entire floor (sometimes even two floors), including leaving bedroom doors open throughout the day (ideally, even at night), and even the use of Tjernlund room-to-room ventilators.

Again, to his credit, Greg tried to stress how important it was that homeowners have realistic expectations regarding the overall effectiveness of these techniques and options.

He also was at pains to make clear how the work of any competent HVAC installer can be easily undermined by a structure that underperforms. In other words, they can design an appropriately sized HVAC system for a Passive House, but if shortcuts occur during the build and the final blower door number comes in higher than expected, or the budget for insulation gets cut, reducing R-values in the structure, then the system they designed has little chance of working as intended. Based on what he wrote, I’m guessing he has dealt with exactly this outcome in the real world — not fun for him, or the homeowners to be sure.

Consequently, by the time Mike from Compass Heating and Air got involved, we had pretty much already settled on using multiple heads. Although it was nice to hear the same consistent message from Greg, Isaac, and Mike in this regard.

In the end, we decided to delete the head in the basement, instead going with three separate heads on the main floor — the largest in the kitchen/family room, and then the other two would go in our bedrooms.

Here are the specs for our system:

Hyper-Heat Compressor (30,000 Btu)

MSZ-FH15NA  (kitchen/family room)

MSZ-FH06NA  (master bedroom)

MSZ-FH06NA  (2nd BR)

head in mbr w: section of drywall

Master bedroom Mitsubishi head and Zehnder supply, both covered to protect against construction debris.

Having the Zehnder supply diffusers on the same wall and near the head of the Mitsubishi has been working well for us. As far as we can tell, there are no discernible issues with this arrangement. By way of comparison, the Mitsubishi head and Zehnder supply diffuser are on separate walls in my daughter’s bedroom — in effect, they’re pushing air towards the center of the room from walls that are perpendicular to one another — but we can’t tell any difference in terms of performance, either when heating or cooling.

mbr and family rm erv:heads construction

Facing camera: Family room Zehnder supply diffuser with Mitsubishi head. To the left, and facing MBR — Zehnder supply and lines for another Mitsubishi head.

Mike was also really good about communicating the system’s requirements to our electrician and our plumber. It was nice to watch all of them walk through the details together, thereby ensuring there were no problems once it came time to start up the individual heads.

condensate and refrigerant

Components for setting up a ductless mini split: refrigerant lines, electric supply, and a drain for condensate.

 

 

Living with a Ductless Mini Split

Having lived with the HVAC system, both the heat pump and ERV, for about a year now, our only real complaint is summer humidity, which I discussed in a previous post here: HVAC (1 of 2): Zehnder ERV

This summer we’re going to try using a dedicated, whole-house dehumidifier, which we think should resolve the issue.

Otherwise, our system has been trouble-free.

In winter, the heads do make some noise, tending to ‘crack’ or ‘pop’, especially when first turning on, or when they come out of defrost mode. Although I’ve read complaints about this online, it’s never really bothered us. I remember how loud our conventional gas-fired furnace was in our last house, especially when it first turned on, so I think it’s important to remember the level of certain sounds in their appropriate context.

Also, this ‘crack’ or ‘pop’ sound is, I suspect, louder than it otherwise would be say in a conventionally built home, since Passive Houses are known to be significantly quieter because of all the air sealing and, in particular, all of the insulation surrounding the structure.

There’s also a noticeable humming sound when the compressor is going through a defrost cycle (especially noticeable at night when the house is otherwise quiet). The heads also temporarily send out cooler air during this defrost cycle, but the cycle is short enough that it hasn’t posed any real comfort issue for us.

heat pump being installed on pad

Setting up the compressor outside.

Regarding interior noise generally, the same holds true even for our refrigerator in the kitchen. We virtually never noticed the fridge in our last house when it was cycling, but in our Passive House it’s arguably the loudest, most consistent noise in the house, especially at night, or if quietly sitting and reading. Again, it took some getting used to, but not really that big of a deal.

In other words, having blocked out, or at least muffled, most of the noise from outdoors (due to extensive air sealing and extensive insulation), any noise indoors becomes much more noticeable and pronounced. The Rockwool we installed between bedrooms-bathrooms, and the kitchen-utility room for sound attenuation definitely helps in this regard (more on this in a later post).

ext line set fully sealed

Line set for the heat pump system exiting the structure after being air sealed.

Just how quiet is a Passive House? Well, one example would be the train tracks that are just a couple of blocks away: When the windows are closed the noise from a passing train is mostly cancelled out — as opposed to when the windows are open, and the train, in contrast, sounds like it’s thundering through our next door neighbor’s yard.

pvc tied down w: duct seal

Interior view of the line set exiting the house.

As far as extreme cold outdoor temperatures are concerned, the system experienced a real test with our recent Polar Vortex weather. Mike was nice enough to check in with us the day before it started just to remind me that the system could shut down if temperatures fell below -18° F, which is what our local weather forecast was predicting.

In fact, this proved entirely accurate. As temperatures eventually fell to -24° F overnight, the system was, in fact, off for a few hours (the Mitsubishi shuts off to protect itself).

With the Zehnder ERV already set to LOW, and using just a couple of small space heaters (one in each bedroom — roughly equivalent to running 2 hair dryers simultaneously), it was easy to get the interior temperatures back up to 68-70° F in less than an hour (from a measured low of 61° F when we first woke up), at which point we turned off the space heaters.

And it was just under 2 hours before the temperatures rose enough outdoors for the heat pump to turn back on. On the second day, the system again turned off, but the interruption was even shorter this time, so we didn’t even bother to turn on the space heaters.

On both days the sun was shining, which definitely helped as light poured in through our south-facing windows, mainly in the kitchen and family room. Even with no additional heat, either from the heat pump or the two small space heaters, the kitchen remained a comfortable 70° F throughout that first day, regardless of the temperature outside.

In the summer, when we have the AC running, we just set the desired temperature on the remotes and largely forget about the system. The three heads together, even in each individual space, have no problem keeping the house and individual rooms cool enough. In this case, it no doubt helps that we have a substantial overhang on the southern portion of our roof, mostly denying the sun an entry point into the home during the hottest days of the year (and the Suntuitive glass on our west-facing windows takes care of afternoon summer sun).

conduit for heat pump thru zip

Conduit for the heat pump exiting the house and air sealed with Roflex/Tescon Vana tape and gasket.

You can see more detailed info regarding air sealing penetrations through the Zip sheathing here: WRB: Zip Sheathing

refrigerant condensate next to beam

Clean, neat lines for the heat pump.

 

 

Single or Multiple Heads?

As far as using a single head to try and heat and cool the entire first floor, in our case about 1500 sq. ft., I can only say that I’m glad we chose to use multiple heads. This really hit home as I was completing interior finishes. For instance, there were times when only the head in the family room/kitchen area was running. When you walked into the bedrooms you could definitely feel the temperature difference since those heads had been turned off (roughly a 5-10° difference). As Greg, Isaac, and Mike — to their credit — were all quick to point out, for some homeowners this temperature swing would be acceptable, even something that could be calmly ignored, while for other homeowners it might well be a heartbreaking and deeply frustrating realization.

Depending on how sensitive someone is to these temperature differences, it could  prove a devastating disappointment if the homeowner is expecting uniform consistency throughout their home. Also, since much of the selling point of Passive House techniques is, in the end, occupant comfort, and not just reduced energy consumption, moving from a comfortable kitchen, for example, to a bedroom that some would find outright chilly, might induce some homeowners to ponder: ‘What was the point of all that air sealing and insulation if I’m still cold in the wintertime and hot in the summer?’ If they hadn’t been warned beforehand, like we were, it would be difficult to argue with their reasoning.

Obviously it’s only our opinion, but if it’s at all possible to fit it into the budget, by all means utilize more than one distribution head. Even if you yourself never feel compelled to turn on any of the other heads in a multi-zone system, a spouse, one of your kids, or a guest probably will want to have the option at some point.

cu beam w: zehnder and hp

Zehnder ComfoTubes and various lines for the heat pump as they enter the basement from the MBR and the family room.

In addition, I would also guess that when going to sell the house multiple heads would be significantly easier to sell to a potential buyer (who wouldn’t appreciate customized HVAC in specific rooms?) rather than trying to prove that a single head is sufficient for an entire home, no matter how small or well-designed. Thoughts worth considering before committing to a specific HVAC system.

north facade w: siding

Compressor with finished charred siding and decorative gravel-cobblestone border.

Also worth noting, utilizing the Q&A section of the Green Building Advisor website is an excellent resource for exploring options before committing to a final HVAC set-up. It’s an excellent way to hear from designers and builders who have experience with multiple ‘green’ projects, not to mention actual homeowners who live in high-performance homes and experience these HVAC systems in the real world, as opposed to just data points put into a proposed energy model (incorrect inputs, along with actual occupant behavior are just two ways a potential system could end up being profoundly inappropriate). This kind of feedback — before construction begins — is undeniably priceless. In fact, I regret not asking more questions on GBA as they came up during the design and construction phases of our build since it is such a valuable resource of useful information.

compressor in snow

View of the same area after our recent Polar Vortex (snowfall, then below zero temps).

The one real risk we took with our HVAC set-up was foregoing any direct conditioning in the basement, either heat or AC. In the summer, no matter how high the temperatures outdoors, the basement stays within 5 degrees of the upstairs temperatures and humidity, so no comfort issues in this regard have presented themselves. In the winter, however, the temperature remains in the 59-61° range, with almost identical humidity readings as the main floor.

ice under unit

Some ice build-up, but almost all of it on the concrete pad below, not on the compressor itself.

Most of the time this isn’t a problem for us, since we’re either working out (the slight chill gets you moving and keeps you moving), or else we’re doing arts and crafts projects, or reading on a couch under a blanket. The only time the chill gets annoying is when sitting at the computer for an extended period of time, so we may try using a plug-in space heater in the office next winter (although the challenge will be to find one that’s reasonably energy-efficient while also remaining effective).

little ice build-up

Close up, showing very little ice present on the compressor itself.

 

 

Mitsubishi Wall-mounted Heads: Beauty or Beast

I’ve read that some interior designers, and even some homeowners, have expressed aesthetic concerns about the distribution heads. If you go on design-oriented websites like Houzz you can come across some really strong negative opinions on the topic.

family rm:kitchen hp head and zehnderFor us, they’ve never been a problem. Much like the Suntuitive glass on our west-facing windows, or even a dark or bright color on an interior accent wall, after a few days, like anything else, you just get used to it. I never found them to be ugly in the first place though.

MBR w: hp head and zehnder

I also grew up with hydronic metal baseboards for heat, while in apartments and our first home we had the typical floor supply and wall return grilles for a gas furnace — point being, the details of any HVAC system are never completely absent from any living space. There’s always something that shows up visually and, typically, that needs to be cleaned at some point.

In addition, the Zehnder ERV and the Mitsubishi heat pumps meant we didn’t have to utilize any framed soffits or duct chases (at least in the case of our specific floor plan) in order to hide bulky runs of traditional metal ductwork, typical in most homes when using a normal furnace. Unless designed with great care, these tend to be obtrusive, taking up premium ceiling, wall, or floor space. And if randomly placed simply for the convenience of the HVAC contractor, they can be downright ugly.

In other words, it doesn’t really matter if you’re building conventionally or if you’re building a Passive House, all the details of an HVAC system — whether it’s individual components, or even how these components will be placed inside a structure — should be carefully thought through (again, ideally before construction begins) to address any performance or aesthetic concerns.

 

 

Controlling and Adjusting the System

As far as the remote controls for the individual heads, we haven’t had any issues.

heat pump remote closed

For the most part, we set them to either heat or AC (roughly 70° and 74° respectively), and then forget about them.

heat pump remote open

To the extent I’ve looked through the manual, these seem straightforward, but again we haven’t really needed to do much in this regard. And when the weather is pleasant outdoors, we take every opportunity to turn off the system completely and then open windows.

Mike also explained the system could be combined with a Kumo cloud set-up, but we’ve been happy with just the hand-held remotes so far.

 

 

Routine Maintenance

And much like with the Zehnder ERV, I try to check the filters for the individual heads at least once a month (more like once a week when I was still doing interior finishes). Just as it takes much longer for the Zehnder filters to get dirty now that construction is over, the same has proven true for the blue filters in the Mitsubishi heads. It seems like about once a month is sufficient to keep up with the dust in the house.

Overall, we’ve been very happy with our HVAC set-up, including the Zehnder ERV and our Mitsubishi ductless mini split. As long as the units don’t have any durability issues, we should be happy with these systems for many years to come.

Roof Details (Air Sealing #3)

0

Top of Wall and Roof Connection

Once the wall assembly details were figured out, and our ceiling set-up detailed, the transition between the two became the next challenge. In other words, how to carry the air barrier over the top of our exterior walls.

I found this helpful article by Chris Corson from The Journal of Light Construction:

An Affordable-Passive-House  (pdf)

Using a waterproof peel-and-stick membrane to wrap over the top of the wall (going from exterior sheathing — in our case 7/16″ Zip sheathing — to interior side of the top plates) seemed like the easiest way to maintain a continuous air barrier at the wall-to-roof junction. The membrane would also have a nice air sealing gasket effect after the trusses were set in place.

I also found this excellent Hammer and Hand video on YouTube (one of their many helpful videos):

Wall-to-Roof Air Barrier

Also, by being able to carry the Zip sheathing up above the top plate of the wall, hugging the bottom of the trusses, meant our 4″ of Roxul Comfortboard 80 over the Zip sheathing would rise above the top of our walls, so that thermally we would be protected going from the exterior walls to the attic, which will be filled with 24″ of blown-in cellulose — making our thermal envelope continuous for the whole house: under the basement slab – exterior of foundation – exterior walls – attic (except for one small gap at the footing-slab-foundation wall connection, which I talk about in a separate post: Foundation Details).

A high R-value wall meets up with a high R-value attic, with no thermal bridging, making our thermal layers continuous. When this is combined with an equally air-tight structure, conditioned air cannot easily escape — resulting in a significantly lower energy demand for heating and cooling (and therefore lower utility bills), and added comfort for the occupants.

Here’s a nice diagram from Fine Homebuilding magazine showing a similar set-up:

021221072-2_med.jpg

Diagram from Fine Homebuilding magazine.

I tried using rolls of conventional peel-and-stick window flashing membrane, purchased from Home Depot and Mendards, but they performed poorly, even in unseasonably warm temperatures for February in Chicago.

I then switched to Grace Ice and Water Shield, normally used as a roofing underlayment along the first 3-6′ of roof edge.

grace-ice-water-shield

Purchased this box at Home Depot.

Since it came on a long roll about 4′ wide, my wife and I cut it down to a series of strips that could more easily be applied to the wall-top plate connection.

While the sun was out, the Grace membrane worked fairly well, especially when pressure was applied with a J-Roller.

grace-vycor-in-the-sun-ii

Grace Ice and Water Shield applied to the top of our wall — covering the Zip sheathing/top plate connection.

Unfortunately, the sun and warmer temperatures didn’t stick around long enough for me to finish.

sealing top of wall w: Grace Vycor in sun

Using a J-Roller to get the Grace Ice and Water Shield to stick better.

 

grace-vycor-in-the-sun

This Simpsons sky didn’t last long. In a matter of hours it was back to rainy, gray, and cold — typical Chicago winter weather for February.

When the weather went gray and cold again, we started to use a heat gun to warm up the Grace membrane, which had turned stiff and nearly useless in the cold.

wagner-heat-gun

Wagner heat gun for warming up the Grace membrane.

After wasting a lot of time and effort trying to pre-heat the Grace membrane before installing it, I finally relented and switched to the much more expensive (but also much more effective) Extoseal Encors tape from Pro Clima. Where the Grace membrane lost virtually all of its stickiness, the Extoseal Encors stuck easily and consistently, with the J-Roller just helping it to lay flatter and more securely.

extoseal-encors-as-gasket

Pro Clima’s Extoseal Encors available from 475 HPBS.

It was a case of trying to be penny wise but ending up pound foolish. Looking back, I would gladly pay an extra $300 in materials to have those hours of frustration back (including the time it took to run to the store and buy the heat gun, which turned out to be ineffective anyway).

installing Extoseal Encors on top of wall cloudy

Finishing up the top of the wall.

After finishing sealing the Zip sheathing-top plate connection on all the outside perimeter walls over the weekend, it was time for the trusses to be installed.

 

 

Trusses

first-truss-swinging-into-place

First truss swinging into place.

Zach let me stand by the front door rough opening and give the crane operator hand signals. It was a fun way to watch the roof take shape.

trusses-going-in-from-inside

Sammy, Zach, and Billy (out of view to the right), landing and setting the trusses.

Once the trusses neared the front door, Zach could signal the crane operator himself, so I was able to get some shots from just outside the construction fence.

 

starting-garage-trusses

Sammy, Zach, and Billy landing trusses on the garage.

 

long-view-of-crane-and-house-east-side

Setting the trusses on the garage — the basic profile of the house comes to life.

Once the trusses were on, and the guys had a chance to install the final top row of Zip sheathing (up to the bottom of the trusses on the exterior side of the wall), I could move inside to seal all the connections from the interior.

 

 

Top of Wall (Interior)

Because of the cold, the Grace membrane was beginning to lift at the edges in certain spots, so just to make sure it had a nice long-term seal, I went around the perimeter of the house and used a layer of Tescon Vana (3″ wide) tape to seal the edge of the Grace membrane.

sealed top plate from interior

Trusses sitting on Grace and Extoseal Encors (other sections of top plate), with the final row of Zip sheathing sealed to the trusses with HF Sealant.

The picture below shows all the connections involved: top of Zip sheathing meeting the roof trusses and the top plate of the outside wall:

sealed top of wall from inside

HF Sealant helps to air seal the Zip-truss and Zip-Grace/Extoseal Encors connections.

 

view of top row of Zip sheathing 1

Looking up at the top row of Zip sheathing attached to the outside edge of the raised heel trusses.

 

 

 

Shingles

We had to wait for shingles for quite some time. First we had to fire our GC’s, and then I had to find a roofer and a plumber (to make penetrations through the roof before the shingles went on). But before the plumber could even start, I had to get the Intello installed on the ceiling. And even before that, I had to figure out the insulation baffles, which I’ll talk about in a separate post.

It took awhile to find a roofer since they would have to make three separate trips for a relatively small job. The first trip was just to set down the Grace Ice and Water Shield at the edges of the roof, along with a synthetic roof underlayment (the consensus was that typical roofing felt wouldn’t hold up to long term exposure). As it turned out, it took weeks before the plumbers made their penetrations through the roof sheathing (literally the day the roofers showed up — a long, horrible story in and of itself that I’ll save for later).

synthetic underlayment at roof peak

Synthetic underlayment covering the ridge line until the shingles and a ridge vent can be installed.

The second trip out was to install the shingles on the roof of the house, while the third trip to install shingles on the garage roof could only happen after the Roxul on the exterior of our Zip sheathing was installed (in order to make a proper sealed connection between the wall of the house and the garage roof).

There weren’t many roofers willing to work with our unique Passive House sequencing, but Peterson Roofing was kind enough to take it on.

Grace ice and water shield rolling up after wind

Grace Ice and Water Shield rolling up on itself after the wind got ahold of it.

Unfortunately, the day after the guys installed the Grace membrane and the synthetic underlayment, we had a cold, blustery day. Once the wind grabbed the Grace membrane, the membrane rolled up on itself, turning it into a real mess.

Because of our recent past bad experiences with general contractors, I just assumed I was on my own, so I spent a couple of hours putting down new layers of the Grace membrane. When Peterson roofing found out, they were shocked I did it myself, and assured me I could’ve called them and they would’ve come back out. We were so used to people not following through, that low expectations meant it didn’t even occur to me to call them.

We initially were going to use Certainteed’s Landmark TL shingle, which mimics a cedar shake shingle profile, but Armando from Midwest Roofing Supply in Schaumburg, Illinois was kind enough to take the time to walk me through the options available, and explained that because our roofline isn’t steep, only the neighbors from their second story windows would get to appreciate the effect. He recommended we save some money, while not giving up on quality or durability, and go with the Landmark Pro product.

shingles being installed w: vents

Shingles going down on the roof of the house.

The shingles went on quickly since we have a relatively small and simple roof. In addition to the aesthetic leap the shingles made on the appearance of the structure, it also meant I didn’t have to go around cleaning up the subfloor every time it rained.

Although the synthetic underlayment worked pretty well at keeping the rain out, if there was significant wind combined with rain, the water easily found its way under the underlayment where it could then drip and fall on the subflooring below — pretty depressing showing up to the job site after a hard rain knowing I was going to spend the first hour just cleaning up and looking for leaks.

roofers shingling south side

Seeing this felt like a tremendous amount of progress was being made. It also meant an end to our roof leaks on the interior.

 

shingle installation progressing

Shingles going on quickly.

After they cut the opening for the ridge vent, but before it was installed, I managed to get this shot from inside:

attic just before ridge vent installed

Attic as cathedral.

 

 

Wall Assembly

0

Or: Dude, what’s in your walls?

When choosing what to put in our walls, we knew we wanted to try and balance high R-values (well above the current building code) with a limited environmental impact.

Here are three articles that address the issue:

(choices)

(no foam)

(twinkies)

After evaluating various materials, including sheep wool,

goodshepherdwool.com

blackmountaininsulationusa.com

we decided to use many of the following elements employed by Hammer & Hand:

madrona-wall-assembly-914x1024-e1459377577722

Hammer & Hand wall assembly for their Madrona House.

In terms of materials, there are any number of options for putting a wall assembly together. For instance, we really wanted to use the sheep wool, but cost and worries (unfounded or not) about availability, led us eventually to Roxul (the Hammer & Hand videos below proved especially helpful in this regard).

After seeing the wall assemblies Hammer & Hand has been using, and how they’ve evolved over time, we felt the Madrona House set-up represented a good balance between cost-environmental impact-availability-ease of installation. We will also be following their lead by using the Prosoco R-Guard series of products to help with air-sealing our building envelope.

Nevertheless, we did make a couple of changes to the Madrona House set-up. For example, we’re using 4″ of Roxul Comfortboard 80 on the exterior side of the Zip sheathing (based on our colder climate zone), and we will be using Roxul R23 batts in the stud bays, along with the Intello vapor retarder, stapled and taped to cover the stud bays. Otherwise, we will be sticking pretty close to the Hammer & Hand Madrona House wall assembly.

So from drywall to exterior siding (interior – exterior), this will be our wall assembly:

  • 5/8″ Drywall
  • Intello Plus vapor retarder (475 High Performance Building Supply)
  • Roxul R23 Batts in 2×6 stud bays (24″ o.c.) (roxul.com)
  • Zip board (for structural sheathing and WRB; seams covered w/ Joint and Seam Filler)
  • 4″ of Roxul Comfortboard 80 (two layers: 2″ + 2″)
  • 2-Layers of 1×4 furring strips (aka battens or strapping) as a nailing base for the cedar siding
  • 1×6 T&G Cedar (charred and oiled with a few boards left natural as an accent — most of it oriented vertically, hence the need for a second layer of furring strips).
wall-assembly-color-coded

A crude rendering of our wall assembly using my daughter’s colored pencils.

A collection of helpful videos explaining the various elements we’re going to use, and why they’re effective:

Without the information available from sources like Building Science Corporation (they have a lot of interesting research documents) and design-builders like Hammer & Hand (not to mention Green Building Advisor and similar sites and forums that allow consumers to Q&A with expert builders and designers in “green” architecture), trying to build structures to such exacting standards (e.g. Passive House – Pretty Good House – Net Zero) would be exceedingly difficult, if not impossible, for those without previous, direct experience in this type of building program. I can’t express how thankful I am that so many individuals and businesses like these are willing to share their years of experience and knowledge with newbies like myself.

Here are the Hammer & Hand videos that initially sparked my interest in using Roxul rather than foam:

Instead of using tape for exterior seams, we are going to use the R-Guard series of products from Prosoco:

For various interior seams and connections we anticipate using the Tescon Vana tape, or an appropriate gunned sealant.

Helpful Links

GBA (Green Building Advisor): Building Green (Starter Q&A)

GBA: Article on minimum thickness of exterior foam by climate zone

GBA Question: Foam vs. Roxul

GBA: 10 Rules of Roof Design

GBA: “Greenest”

GBA: Passive House Design (5-part video series) Requires membership after Part I, but well worth it.

BSC (Building Science Corporation): Perfect Wall (pdf)

BSC: Hygrothermal Analysis of Exterior Rockwool Insulation (pdf)

BSC: Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls (pdf)

BSC: Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (pdf)

GBA: Mineral Wool Over Exterior Sheathing

Passivhaus Trust (UK): how-to-build-a-passivhaus-rules-of-thumb (pdf)

GBA: The Pretty Good House

GBA: Passive House Certification: Looking Under the Hood